Welcome!

June 28, 2015: Want to get up to speed on Connecticut adoptee rights?  Check out our new FAQ.

ATTENTION CONNECTICUT ADOPTEES!

On July 1, 2015 a new law became effective in Connecticut that gives certain adult adoptees the right to obtain a copy of their original birth certificate.

Your are eligible to receive your original birth certificate under the new law if:

  • You were born and adopted in Connecticut.
  • You will be 18 or older on or after July 1, 2015.
  • Your adoption was finalized on or after October 1, 1983.

Pursuant to the new law, you are also entitled to receive a Contact Preference Form and Medical History Form, if they have been filed by your biological parents with the Department of Children and Families.

You must file an application and pay a fee to the Department of Public Health in Hartford to receive your original birth certificate.  The Application Form to obtain an Original Birth Certificate can be obtained from the Department of Public Health.

Notice to Biological Parents: The new law provides that you may file a Contact Preference Form and updated Medical History Form with the Department of Children and Families, which will be provided upon request to your adult offspring. The Contact Preference Form allows you to indicate whether or not, and how, you wish to be contacted. The Medical History Form allows you to provide current, updated medical health information that may be critical to the health of your offspring and their children.

For more information, please contact:

Department of Public Health, Vital Records Office: (860) 509-7700
(Original Birth Certificates)

Department of Children and Families: (860) 550-6300
(Contact Preference and Medical History Forms)

Click here to print a copy of an InformationalFlyer regarding the new law.  Please feel free to distribute!

 

UPDATE MARCH 24, 2015

Birthmothers Hope Access to Key Documents Will Help Advance Adoption Reform, CTNewsJunkie March 23, 2015

 

URGENT UPDATE MARCH 19, 2015:

PLEASE SUBMIT EMAIL TESTIMONY IMMEDIATELY IN SUPPORT OF SENATE BILL 1067, SCHEDULED FOR PUBLIC HEARING MONDAY, MARCH 23!!

COMPLETE INSTRUCTIONS HERE

UPDATE MARCH 17, 2015

YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED…

To a screening of “Four Birth Mothers For Birth Mothers“, a short documentary by award winning film maker Jean Strauss on Monday, March 23, 2015, at 1:00 pm in Room 1C of the Legislative Office Building in Hartford.

Eileen McQuade, former President of the American Adoption Congress and a Connecticut resident who is featured in the film, will be present along with other birth mothers for a Q&A.

This event is cosponsored by Senator Steve Cassano and Access Connecticut, the adoptee rights organization which supports the right of adult adoptees to obtain a copy of their original birth certificates. Last year, Public Act 14-133 restored this right to adult adoptees whose adoptions were finalized after October 1, 1983. Access Connecticut seeks to restore the right of access to all Connecticut adoptees and believes that the documentary would help inform lawmakers as they consider this and related legislation.

UPDATE MARCH 16, 2015

PRESS RELEASE:

New law provides access to original birth certificates for some adopted persons

HARTFORD (March 16, 2015) – Connecticut adoptees who will be 18 or older by July 1, 2015, your day has come….(PDF PressRelease.)

INFORMATIONAL FLYER ABOUT NEW LAW:  PDF Flyer

VOLUNTEERS PLEASE DISTRIBUTE

UPDATE MARCH 6, 2015

WE ARE WORKING ON TWO MAJOR INITIATIVES:

FIRST INITATIAVE:  ADOPTEE RIGHTS RESTORED FOR 24,000 ADOPTEES STARTING JULY 1, 2015!!

We are counting down to the July 1, 2015 effective date of Public Act 14-133, which restores the right of adoptees whose adoptions were finalized after October 1, 1983 and who are age 18 and older to obtain a copy of their original birth certificate.  Check out our counter to the right, merrily counting down the days until it the law becomes effective!!  Many thanks to volunteer Christian Iamartino for this nifty tool!

On March 16, 2015 we will be issuing a Press Release and an Informational Flyer as part of our efforts to inform the public about this historic event.    BE PART OF HISTORY!  Help us get the word out by signing up for our email news letter, and distributing the flyer at your doctor’s office/local community gathering/friends/family, etc.

Access Connecticut is seeking to identify adoptees who are eligible to receive their original birth certificate under the new law and would be willing to be interviewed or speak to the media. Please contact Carol Goodyear at (860)558-6850 for details.

SECOND INITIATIVE:  THE BIRTH PARENT RIGHTS BILL WE ARE SEEKING HAS JUST BEEN RAISED IN THE JUDICIARY COMMITTEE!

Thanks to Co-Chairs Sen. Eric Coleman and Rep. William Tong Senate Bill 1067 HAS BEEN RAISED.  If passed, the bill will allow a biological parent, who voluntarily terminated his or her parental rights to a child, access to documents that such biological parent signed or received in connection with the parental rights termination proceeding.  Our research indicates NO WRITTEN “PROMISES OF PRIVACY/SECRECY” were EVER made in Connecticut. If passed, this bill will help us obtain documents that prove this.  This bill is part of our educational efforts to bust myths and misinformation that impede our efforts to restore adoptee rights to original birth certificates.

Link to the text of Senate Bill 1067.

WE ARE SEEKING CONNECTICUT RELINQUISHMENT DOCUMENTS SIGNED BEFORE OCTOBER 1, 1983…..CAN YOU HELP?  CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFORMATION….

Want a quick summary of status of adoptee rights in Connecticut (and the US)? This video features Access Connecticut President Karen Caffrey speaking at the First United Methodist Church of Dallas, Texas on August 17, 2014 about our history, progress and strategy for the future. 

Update January 24, 2015

We are incredibly pleased to announce that on June 6, 2014 Governor Dannel Malloy signed into law Public Act 14-133 (House Bill 5144), which restores the right of adoptees adopted after October 1, 1983 to access their original birth certificates upon reaching the age of 18. The bill is effective July 1, 2015.  We are completely thrilled and grateful that the Governor signed the bill, which represents years of work on the part of literally thousands of supporters of adoptee rights.  To read about the history of the bill and its passage, see this June 14, 2014 update on Public Act 14-133.

SO WHAT ELSE?

Access Connecticut remains committed to restoring the right of access to ALL Connecticut adoptees!  We had decided for many tactical reasons to wait until 2016 to push a full access bill, the main reason being our partial access bill doesn’t go into effect into July 1, 2015.  Get on board NOW to help us work towards restoration of the right of access!

Please Like our Facebook page to keep up with moment to moment news.  AND BE SURE YOU HAVE SIGNED UP FOR OUR EMAIL NEWSLETTER!!  Please Share the page and this information with your friends and family who are supportive of restoring the right of access to adult adoptees.

(Note:  Access Connecticut would like to thank Mr. Matthew Hallisey, managing principal of Matthew Hallisey Government Affairs, for all his support and guidance in helping to shepherd Public Act 14-133 through the legislative process.  Our success to date would not be possible without him!)

Who Is Access Connecticut?

Access Connecticut is a grassroots organization of adoptees, birth parents, adoptive parents and adoption professionals dedicated to re-establishing the right of adult adoptees to access their original birth certificates, which was taken away in 1975.

Access Connecticut has one goal:  We seek to re-establish the right of adult adoptees  to access their original birth certificate, a right which the all non-adopted citizens have under Connecticut law.  Prior to 1975 all adoptees born in Connecticut had the right to obtain their true, original birth certificates (OBCs) upon reaching the age of majority.

Every adoptee has two birth certificates: A true, original birth certificate (OBC) created the day they are born and a false, amended birth certificate. The false birth certificate is created by the state when their adoption is finalized (up to a year or more after their birth), and says their adoptive parents are their biological parents. The false birth certificate is the adoptee’s legal birth certificate.

More than four out of five Connecticut residents (85%) would support a law allowing adult adoptees to obtain copies of their original birth certificate naming their birth parents.  (See this 2007 Univ. of Conn. Survey)

Laws in several states now acknowledge the unrestricted right of adult adoptees to access their OBCs. These states include most recently our neighbors in Maine, New Hampshire and Rhode Island.

Join our group of adoptees, birth/first and adoptive parents, adoption professionals and our friends in making Connecticut the next access state!

CURRENT ACTION INITIATIVES:

To help:

1) Sign up on our email list.

2) Like our FaceBook page and follow our progress and calls to action.

3) Invite your friends to Like our FaceBook page.

4) Donate to Access Connecticut.

5) Contact us if you’re interested in volunteering to do more.

 Your voice and your opinion matter.

Your support of Access Connecticut matters.

Your joining our email list matters.

Your personal letter or email to a legislator matters.

Your attending a hearing or a rally matters.

The Connecticut Adoption Survey October 2007: Conducted by the University of Connecticut Center for Survey Research & Analysis

*Thanks to our friends at NJCARE for generously sharing resources from their website.*

Site design by thetypeisright.com

We’d love to hear from you. Email, Call, Snail mail or visit us on Facebook.  Comments are not enabled for this website.

4 Responses to Welcome!

  1. julie kobus says:

    i’m interested in supporting access ct. thanks to the article in
    ct magazine!

  2. Kathy Sloan says:

    I am very interested in your efforts as I work in the area of abuses of women’s human rights in third party reproduction (TPR) that includes the rights of children of TPR to knowledge of their biological parents.

  3. Gayle Swift says:

    Both my now-adult children have contact with their birth mothers. Denying them access to their OBC’s seems absurd, cruel and is an infringement of their civil right.

  4. Leora says:

    Hello there! I’m loving the work that all of you are doing in trying to provide adoptees with their birth roots!! My husband and I are from Massachusetts, and back in 2011 I found my husbands half brother that shared the same birth mother as him!! Their birth mother had passed away in 2010 the year before I found him. It was very important to my husband, as his brother to have this family member in his life! This male adoptee was born in Massachusetts in 1970. I was on the phone everyday with the social workers that now have the access to the records from Brightside orphanage. They were definitely not cooperative, and I had to piece together all of the (little clues) they gave me in order to help find him!! Once I found his name I gave it to the social worker, and she could not find him, but did have all his record! I actually called up an aunt that he has, and she contacted him for me……After a couple of days he called my husband!! My husband gave him all the info, and had him call the social worker that was helping me. He called her, and of course they were a match!! Since he was born in 1970 Massachusetts released to him his original birth certificate prior to adoption, and all the names on it matched! What an amazing experience!! My husband, and him now have an incredible relationship as if they grew up together! My husband was born in 1980 (ten years later), and there was no way that his brother would have searched for him, because he never knew my husband existed! The meaning to my story is that it is very important for birth siblings to have access to these adoption records as well! Even if the birth parents want no contact, at least give the siblings a chance to explain to them who they (really are!!). Now here we are in 2014, and my husband learns that he has another sibling out there in the world somewhere! This time the adoptee, and my husband share the same birth father! The only problem is this adoptee was born in either 1984 or 1985, and he was born in Connecticut!!!!!!! My husband and I have contacted everyone!!, and nobody is giving up any information…….In this case my husband and I know for a fact that the birth parents (who are still dating) want no contact with the adoptee, and have demanded to us that we don not start searching! This adoptee has four siblings that would love to get to know him, and maybe he is searching??, but the one thing we have in common is that the state of Connecticut will not help out the adoptee or his siblings!! What a shame, especially after I see what an incredible relationship my husband has with his other brother!! My husbands brother that we did find does not know his birth father, but was extremely excited that we searched for him, and gave him all his medical history, and explained his roots to him!! He was always told he was Dutch, and he is French, Italian, and Scottish ha ha!!! Also their mother passed away from bone cancer at 59 years old, as did her father!! Very important for the adoptee to know! Anyway sorry for rambling on, but I would love for Connecticut adoptees to be given access, because then maybe he will start to search for us!! Any help someone could help us with would be greatly appreciated!! Thanks Lee

Comments are closed.